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An excellent page of links to online psychology resources. Starting to show its age now I`m afraid - a few of the links are dead, but still an excellent set of resources. You can also try the gutenberg project and online-authors from my links page and see what they`ve got....

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Classics in the History of Psychology


Links to About 200 On-Line Documents Related to the History of Psychology

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Last updated 4 January 2001.

Ackerman, F. L., Ward, H., Hubbert, M. K., & Hitchcock, D. (1933). Introduction to technocracy. John Day.

Adler, Alfred. (1931). What life should mean to you (Chapter 2: "Mind and body"). (The Value of Knowledge).

Angell, James Rowland & Moore, Addison W. (1896). Studies from the psychological laboratory of the University of Chicago: 1. Reaction-Time: A study in attention and habit. Psychological Review, 3, 245-258. (George's Page.) [Cited by Dewey as the first study in functionalist psychology.]

Angell, James R. (1903). The relation of structural and functional psychology to philosophy. Decennial publications of the University of Chicago (First Series, Vol. 3, pp. 55-73). (George's Page)

Angell, James R. (1906). Psychology (3rd edition). (George's Page). [The major textbook on early 20th-century functionalism.]

Aquinas, Thomas. (ca. 1270). Summa theologica. (New Advent). [The most important philosophical work of the High Middle Ages. See especially Questions 75-102 of the First Part ("Man").]

Aristotle. (ca. 350 BC). Ethics. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [Probably the second most important of "The Philosopher's" works, from a psychological point of view.]

Aristotle. (ca. 350 BC). On dreams. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [A minor work, but none the less interesting psychologically.]

Aristotle. (ca. 350 BC). On sense and the sensible. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT).

Augustine of Hippo. (ca. 400). Confessions and Enchiridion. (Internet Christian Library). [Some of the most important work by the most influential philosopher of early Christianity.]

Augustine of Hippo. (ca. 400). Confessions. (New Advent). [One of the most important works by the most influential philosopher of early Christianity.]

Augustine of Hippo. (ca. 400). On the trinity (Christian Classics Ethereal Library, Wheaton College). [See especially Book IX on the nature of the mind.]

Augustine of Hippo. (ca. 400). A treatise on the soul and its origin. (New Advent). [From the most influential philosopher of early Christinaity.]

Babbage, Charles. (1832). Reflections on the decline of science in England, and on some of its causes. (Project Gutenberg). [Babbage's critique of the Royal Society, and plea for a less aristocratic brand of science.]

Babbage, Charles. (1832). The economy of machinery and manufactures. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought). [The most important work of the inventor of the Difference Engine and the Analytical Engine.]

Bacon, Francis. (1620). Novum Organum. (Philosophie Sommaire, Académie de Toulouse). [downloadable in RTF.]

Bacon, Francis. (1660) The new Atlantis. (Philosophie Sommaire, Académie de Toulouse). [downloadable in RTF.]

Bacon, Roger. (1268). On experimental science. (Internet Medieval Sourcebook, Paul Halsall at Fordham U.). [From the leading experimenter of the Middle Ages.]

Baldwin, James Mark. (1896). A new factor in evolution. (George's Page). [The source for the "Baldwin effect" in evolutionary theory.]

Baldwin, James Mark. (1906). Mental development in the child and the race (3rd. ed.). (George's Page). [From the most important developmental psychologist of the early 20th century.]

Bergson, Henri. (1911). Creative evolution (Arthur Mitchell, Trans.). (George's Page)

Berkeley, George. (1710). A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [British empiricism at perhaps its most pure.]

Berkeley, George. (1710). A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge (sec. 1-81). (The Value of Knowledge). [British empiricism at perhaps its most pure.]

Brentano, Franz. (1874). Psychology from an empirical standpoint (sec I. "The concept and purpose of psychology"). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the primary advocate of intentionality as the primary "mark of the mental." Titchner considered him to be Wundt's most important opponent.]

Bridgman, Percy. (1927). The logic of modern physics (Introduction, portion of Chapter 1). (The Value of Knowledge). [The origin of "operationism" and "operational definitions."]

Chomsky, Noam. (1959). A Review of B. F. Skinner's Verbal Behavior. Language, 35, 26-58. (CogPrints)

Chomsky, Noam. (1968). Language and mind ("Linguistic contributions to the study of mind (Future)"). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the most influential linguist of the 20th century. Chomsky ranks as the most cited living human being.]

Clifford, W. K. (1886). The ethics of belief. (A.J. Burger). [Prime statement of 19th-century positivism: "It is wrong everywhere and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence."]

Combe, George. (1834). Elements of phrenology. (The Brontës and Phrenology, Peter Friesen, Plattsburgh State University of New York). [Very popoular antebellum American textbook on phrenology.]

Comte, Auguste. (1830-1841/1855). The positive philosophy of Auguste Comte (Harriet Martineau, Ed. & Trans.). (Central Connecticut State University Honors Program). [Abridged translation of Cours de philosophie positive by the 19th-century British activist that Comte is said to have preferred to his own work.]

Comte, Auguste. (1856). A general view of positivism (portion of Chapter 1). (The Value of Knowledge). [The source of positivism.]

Condillac, Étienne Bonnot de. (1746). Essai sur l'origine des connoissances humaines. (Bibliothèque Nationale de France).

Condillac, Étienne Bonnot de. (1754). Traité des sensations. (Philosophie Sommaire, Académie de Toulouse). [downloadable in RTF.]

Condorcet, Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de, (1793-1794). Esquisse d'un tableau historique des progrès de l'esprit humain. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought).

Cooley, Charles Horton. (1909). Social organization: A study of the larger mind. (George's Page) [From one of the leading American social-psychological theorists of the early 20th century.]

Cuvier, Georges (1825). Discourse on the revolutionary upheavals on the surface of the globe and on the changes which they have produced in the animal kingdom. (Johnstonia) [Important precursor to Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection.]

Darwin, Charles. (1859). On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. (Project Gutenberg). [The origin of the theory of evolution by natural selection.]

Darwin, Charles. (1871). The descent of man. (Tapestry). [The extension of the theory of evolution by natural selection to humans.]

Darwin, Charles. (1872). The expression of the emotions in man and animals. (George's Page). [First treatise on the evolutionary origins of emotional expression.]

Darwin, Charles. (1872). The expression of the emotions in man and animals. (Project Gutenberg). [First treatise on the evolutionary origins of emotional expression.]

Descartes, René. (1637). Discourse on the method of rightly conducting the reason, and seeking truth in the sciences. (Against All Reason web site). [One of the founders of modern philosophy sets out his method of inquiry, proving that God and the human soul exist along the way. See especially Discourse 4.]

Descartes, René. (1637). Discourse on the method of rightly conducting the reason, and seeking truth in the sciences. (Project Gutenberg). [One of the founders of modern philosophy sets out his method of inquiry, proving that God and the human soul exist along the way. See especially Discourse 4.]

Descartes, René. (1637). Discourse on the method of rightly conducting the reason, and seeking truth in the sciences. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [One of the founders of modern philosophy sets out his method of inquiry, proving that God and the human soul exist along the way. See especially Discourse 4.]

Descartes, René. (1637). Discourse on the method of rightly conducting the reason, and seeking truth in the sciences. (The Value of Knowledge). [One of the founders of modern philosophy sets out his method of inquiry, proving that God and the human soul exist along the way. See especially Discourse 4.]

Descartes, René. (1637). Discours de la méthode (in original French). (ABU: la Bibliothèque Universelle).

Descartes, René (1641). Meditations on first philosophy. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [Descartes proves once again the necessity of the human soul. See especially the Meditation 2.]

Descartes, René (1641). Les meditations (in original French). (ABU: la Bibliothèque Universelle).

Descartes, René (1649). Passions of the soul. (Descartes Web Site, Claremont Graduate University Department of Philosophy, CA). [On-line English translation incomplete as yet. Descartes' primary exposition of the human soul; where he develops his theory mind-body interaction.]

Dewey, John. (1886). The psychological standpoint. Mind, 11, 1-19. (George's Page)

Dewey, John. (1886). Psychology as philosophic method. Mind, 11, 153-173. (George's Page)

Dewey, John. (1894). The theory of emotion I: Emotional attitudes. (George's Page). [From one of the founders of American functionalism.]

Dewey, John. (1895). The theory of emotion II: The significance of emotions. (George's Page). [From one of the founders of American functionalism.]

Dewey, John. (1910). How we think. (George's Page). [From one of the founders of American functionalism.]

Dewey, John. (1916). Democracy and education. (Project Gutenberg). [One of the most influential works in American educational theory.]

Dewey, John. (1932). Philosophy's search for the immutable, Chapter 2 of The question of certainty. (The Value of Knowledge). [From one of the founders of American functionalism.]

Dilthey, Wilhelm. (1883). Introduction to the human sciences (Preface). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the leading advocate of hermeneutics and "human science" in the 19th century.]

Du Bois, W.E.B. (1903). The souls of black folk. (Project Gutenberg). [From an important early advocate of agitation and protest to improve the lot of African-Americans. Major opponent of Booker T. Washinton's "accomodationist" strategy.]

Epictetus. (ca. 100). Discourses. (Wilkes U., PA). [Introduction to Roman Stoic thought.]

Epictetus. (ca. 100). Enchiridion (Handbook). (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [Very brief introduction to Roman Stoicism.]

Euclid. (ca. 300 BC). Elements. (David Joyce of Clark U., MA) [The first treatise on geometry.]

Freud, Sigmund. (1886-1939). Abstracts of the standard edition of the psychological works of Sigmund Freud. (New York Freudian Society).

Freud, Sigmund. (1932a). The anatomy of the mental personality, Lecture XXXI. (The Value of Knowledge). [Includes the famous drawing of the id, ego, and superego.]

Freud, Sigmund. (1932b). A philosophy of life, Lecture XXXV. (The Value of Knowledge). [From the founder of psychoanalysis.]

Freud, Sigmund. (1933, 1940). The structure of the unconscious. "Conscious, unconscious, preconscious" from An Outline of Psychoanalysis (1940) and "Id, ego, superego" from New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (1933). (Darryl Wadsworth of U. Pennsylvania). [From the founder of psychoanalysis.]

Galen. (ca. 175). On the natural faculties. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [The state of the art in Ancient Roman medical knowledge.]

Galen. (ca. 175). On diagnosis from dreams. (Ancient Medicine/Medicina Antiqua). [The state of the art in Ancient Roman medical knowledge.]

Galen. (ca. 175). On Hippocrates' "On the nature of man". (Ancient Medicine/Medicina Antiqua).

Galen. (ca. 175). "On the elements" according to Hippocrates. (Ancient Medicine/Medicina Antiqua).

Galton, Francis. (1864-1865). Hereditary character and talent. (Pictures of Health). [From the founder of eugenics.]

Gibson, J.J.. (1955). Perception as a function of stimulation, with glosses by U. T. Place. (Cognitive Questions).

Godwin, William. (1793). Enquiry concerning political justice. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought).

Godwin, William. (1831). Thoughts on man, his nature, productions, and discoveries. (Anarchist Archives by Dana Ward). [Important discussions of mind and body, human nature, and phrenology by a significant English anarchist and proto-Romantic (and the father of Mary Shelly).]

Harvey, William. (1628). On the motion of the heart and blood in animals. (Internet History of Science Sourcebook, Edited by Paul Halsall of Fordham University).

Hegel, G.W.F. (1807). Phenomenology of mind. (J. Carl Mickelsen of U. Idaho). [The most important treatise of one of the most important post-Kantian philosophers.]

Helmholtz, Hermann. (1863). Conservation of force. (Internet History of Science Sourcebook). [The paper that proved the impossibilty of the immaterial mind.]

Helmholtz, Hermann. (1878). The facts of perception. (The Value of Knowledge). [One of the most important papers by one of the most important scientists (and neo-Kantians) of the 19th century.]

Henle, Mary. (1975). Gestalt psychology and Gestalt therapy. (The Gestalt Archive). [A repudiation of Fritz Perls' "Gestalt therapy" by one of the leaders of Gestalt psychology.]

Hippocrates. (ca. 400 BC?). Many texts including "On injuries of the head" and "On the sacred disease" Internet Classics Archive at MIT. [State of the art medical thought in Ancient Greece.]

Hobbes, Thomas. (1640). The elements of law natural and politic. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought). [See especially Part I: "On Human Nature."]

Hobbes, Thomas. (1650). Leviathan. (Secular Web). [The most important work of the 17th-century's most influential British philosopher. Argues that human thought and feeling is nothing but "calculation," 300 years before the invention of the computer.]

Hobbes, Thomas. (1650). Leviathan (Chapters 1-5). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the most important work of the 17th-century's most influential British philosopher. Argues that human thought and feeling is nothing but "calculation," 300 years before the invention of the computer.]

Hume, David. (1739). A treatise of human nature (Book I). (Hume Archives at U. Tennessee, Martin). [British scepticism and empiricism at its finest. Kant said it roused him from his "dogmatic slumber" to write the Critique of pure reason.]

Hume, David. (1748). A enquiry concerning human understanding. (Hume Archives at U. Tennessee, Martin). [Famous mainly for the admonition that any book not containing empirical fact or mathematical reasoning should be "cast into the flames, for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion."]

Hume, David. (1779). Dialogues concerning natural religion. (Hume Archives at U. Tennessee, Martin).

Husserl, Edmund. (1937a). The crisis of European sciences (Part II, sec. 22-27 on Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant). (The Value of Knowledge). [A late work from the founder of phenomenology.]

Husserl, Edmund. (1937b). The crisis of European sciences (Part IIIB: The Way into Phenomenological Transcendental Philosophy from Psychology. sec. 57-68. The fateful separation of transcendental philosophy and psychology.). (The Value of Knowledge). [A late work from the founder of phenomenology.]

Huxley, Thomas H. (1874). On the hypothesis that animals are automata, and its history. (The Huxley File).

James, William. Many different texts including "The Ph.D. octopus" and "Pluralism, pragmatism, and instrumental truth": A Stroll with William James by Frank Pajares of Emory U.

James, William. (1897). The will to believe. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [From the most influential American psychologist/philosopher of the 19th century.]

James, William. (1899). Talks to teachers on psychology and to students on some of life's ideals. (A Stroll with William James).

James, William. (1902). Varieties of religious experience. (Against All Reason web site) [From the most influential American psychologist/philosopher of the 19th century.]

James, William. (1902). Varieties of religious experience. (Project Gutenberg) [From the most influential American psychologist/philosopher of the 19th century.]

James, William. (1902). Varieties of religious experience. (Psych Web) [From the most influential American psychologist/philosopher of the 19th century.]

James, William. (1904). The Chicago school. Psychological Bulletin, 1, 1-5. (George's Page).

James, William. (1907). Pragmatism: A new name for some old ways of thinking. (George's Page).

James, William. (1910). Pragmatism: A new name for some old ways of thinking. (Alan Cook).

James, William. (1911). The meaning of truth. (George's Page)

James, William. (1912). Essays in radical empiricism. (George's Page)

Jung, Carl. (1933). The basic postulates of analytical psychology, Chapter IX of Modern man in search of a soul . (The Value of Knowledge) [From the founder of "Analytic" psychotherapy.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1781/1787). Critique of pure reason (N. Kemp Smith, trans.). (Kant on the web). [Perhaps the single most important and influential philosophical work written in the last 500 years.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1781/1787). Critique of pure reason (N. Kemp Smith, trans.). (U. Chicago Philosophy Project). [Perhaps the single most important and influential philosophical work written in the last 500 years.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1781/1787). Critique of pure reason (J.M.D. Meiklejohn, trans.). (Björn's Guide to Philosophy). [For most purposes, it is advisable to use the Kemp Smith translation instead if it is available.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1781). Kritik der reinen Vernunft. (Projekt Gutenberg-DE)

Kant, Immanuel. (1787). Kritik der reinen Vernunft (Zweite hin und wieder verbesserte Auflage). (Projekt Gutenberg-DE)

Kant, Immanuel. (1783). Prolegomena to any future metaphysics. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [Essentially a précis of the Critique of pure reason.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1788). Critique of practical reason (T.K. Abbott, trans.). (Björn's Guide to Philosophy). [Kant on the question of morals.]

Kant, Immanuel. (1788). Kritik der praktischen Vernunft. (Projekt Gutenberg-DE).

Kant, Immanuel. (1790). Critique of judgement (J.C. Meredith, trans.). (Björn's Guide to Philosophy).

Kant, Immanuel. (1790). Kritik der Urteilskraft. (Projekt Gutenberg-DE).

Key, Ellen. (1900/1909). The century of the child. (History of Education Site).

Koffka, Kurt. (1935). Why psychology?, from Principles of gestalt psychology . (The Value of Knowledge) [From the most important textbook of Gestalt psychology.]

Köhler, Wolfgang. (1929). An old pseudoproblem. (The Gestalt Archive). [From one of the founders of Gestalt psychology.]

La Mettrie, Julien Offray de. (1748). Man a machine (Trans. of L'homme machine). (Research Institute for the Humanities, Chinese University of Hong Kong).

Leibniz, Gottfried. (1714). The monadology. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [The main metaphysical treatise from the leading Rationalist of the 18th century.]

Leibniz, Gottfried. (1714). The monadology (sec 1-90). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the main metaphysical treatise from the leading Rationalist of the 18th century.]

Leibniz, Gottfried. (1714). La monadologie. (ABU: la Bibliothèque Universelle).

Le Bon, Gustave. (1895). The crowd: A study of the popular mind. (Project Gutenberg). [Major early treatise on "mob" psychology.]

Le Bon, Gustave. (1912). The psychology of revolution. (Project Gutenberg).

Locke, John. (1689). An essay concerning human understanding . (Factasia Classics of Philosophy). [Perhaps the founding document of British empiricism.]

Locke, John. (1689). An essay concerning human understanding . (ILT Classics, Columbia U., NY). [Perhaps the founding document of British empiricism.]

Lombroso, Cesare. (1906). The savage origin of tatooing. (Pictures of Health). [From the man who gave us the theory of "criminal types."]

Lucretius. (ca. 50 BC). On the nature of things. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [Most influential statement of Roman Epicurianism.]

Mach, Ernst. (1886/1905). The analysis of sensations (Introductory remarks: Anti-metaphysical). (The Value of Knowledge). [From a leader among 19th-century phenomenalists.]

Machiavelli, Nicolo. (1513). The prince. (Project Gutenberg). [A treatise on the mechanics of political power in Renaissance Italy.]

Malthus, Thomas. (1798). An essay on the principle of population. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought). [One of the most significant economic texts ever written. The basis of much later work, including the economic texts of Babbage and Mill.]

Marx, Karl & Engels, Friedrich . (1848). The comunist manifesto. (Project Gutenberg). [Perhaps the single most influential book of the 19th century.]

Marx, Karl. (1867). Capital. (Marx & Engles WWW Library,). [The economic theory behind communism.]

McCosh, James. (1875). The Scottish philosophy. (Internet Encyclpedia of Philosophy). [Survey of Scottish philosophers from about 1700 to about 1850.]

Mead, George Herbert. Many different texts. George's Page by Lloyd Gordon Ward and Robert Throop of Brock U. [The founder of "social behaviorism."]

Mendel, Gregor. (1865). Experiments in plant hybridization. (MendelWeb) [The origin of gene theory.]

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. (1942). The structure of behavior (Introduction: "The problem of the relations of consciousness and nature"). (The Value of Knowledge). [From one of the most influential phenomenologists of the 20th century. Contains explicit responses to physiological psychologists of the day, and to the Gestalt Theorists as well.]

Mill, John Stuart. (1848). Principles of political economy. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought). [The standard English economic text in the second half of the 19th century.]

Mill, John Stuart. (1863). Utilitarianism. (University of Adelaide Library).

Mill, John Stuart (1869). The subjection of women.. (Wiretap Electronic Text Archive).

Morgan, C. Lloyd. (1903). An introduction of comparative psychology (new edition, revised). (George's Page).

Morgan, C. Lloyd. (1927). Emergent evolution. (George's Page).

Newton, Isaac. (1687). Mathematical principles of natural philosophy. (Andrew Motte, Trans. 1729, under construction). [Probably the single most important text in the history of science.]

Pascal, Blaise. (1645). La machine d'aarithmétique. (ABU: la Bibliothèque Universelle). [Pascal's own account of his adding machine.]

Pascal, Blaise. (1660). Pensées (English trans.). (Christian Classics Ethereal Library at Wheaton Collge).

Pascal, Blaise. (1671). Pensées (in original French). (ABU: la Bibliothèque Universelle).

Pavlov, Ivan P. (1924). Lectures on the work of the cerebral hemispheres (Lecture 1). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the "grandfather" of behaviorism.]

Peirce, Charles S. (1878). How to make our ideas clear (Sec. II). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the founder of American pragmatism.]

Piaget, Jean. (1955). The elaboration of the universe, from The construction of reality in the child. (The Value of Knowledge). [From the most influential developmental psychologist of the 20th century.]

Piaget, Jean. (1968). Genetic epistemology (Chapter 1). (The Value of Knowledge). [From the most influential developmental psychologist of the 20th century.]

Pico della Mirandola, Giovanni. (1486). Oration in the dignity of man. (Cosma Shalizi at Wisconsin U.). [Major statement of Renaissance humanism.]

Place, U.T. (1955-1956). Letters to J. J. Gibson, with glosses by J.J.G.. (Cognitive Questions)

Plato. (ca. 380 BC). Meno. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT) [The first major treatise to put forward the claim that knowledge is innate.]

Plato. (ca. 380 BC). Republic. (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy). [Plato's middle-period political theory. See especially Book IV on the structure of the psyche.]

Plato. (ca. 380 BC). Republic. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [Plato's middle-period political theory. See especially Book IV on the structure of the psyche.]

Plato. (ca. 380 BC). Republic. (Project Gutenberg). [Plato's middle-period political theory. See especially Book IV on the structure of the psyche.]

Plotinus. (ca. 260). The enneads. (Internet Classics Archive at MIT). [The primary statement of Roman Neoplatonism. See especially Ennead IV, "On the essence of the soul."]

Presocratic Philosophers. (600-400 BC). The complete text of John Burnet's (1920) translation of all the fragments of the presocratic philosopers. (Exploring Plato's Dialogues, by Anthony F. Beavers, U. Evansville, IN) [See especially Heraclitus' fragments on the nature of the psyche.]

Quetelet, Adolphe. (1835/1842). Treatise on man (Preface). (Pictures of Health). [From one of the founders of statistical reasoning in the social sciences.]

Rivers, William H.R. (1918, Feb 2). An address on the repression of war experience. Lancet, 1 173-177. (Counter-Attack).

Ross, Edward Alsworth. (1908). Social psychology: An outline and source book. (George's Page) [One of the first two textbook on social psychology.]

Russell, Bertrand. (1905). On denoting. (Research Institute for the Humanities, Chinese University of Hong Kong).

Russell, Bertrand. (1928). What is the soul? (Cosma Shalizi at Wisconsin U.). [From one of the most influential British philosophers of the 20th century.]

Saussure, Ferdinand de. (1910). Third course of lectures on general lintuistics (Introduction). (The Value of Knowledge). [From one of the founders of modern linguistics.]

Schlick, Moritz. (1925). Epistemology and modern physics. (The Value of Knowledge). [From the founder of (Vienna Circle) Logical Positivism.]

Skinner, B. F. (1989). The origins of cognitive thought. (The Value of Knowledge). [The primary radical behaviorist's crtitique of cognitivism.]

Smith, Adam. (1776). An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations. (University of Adelaide).

Spinoza, Benedicto. (1675). Ethics. (Middle Tennessee State University Philosophy WebWorks). [From a leading post-Cartesian Rationalist.]

Taylor, Frederick. (1911). Principles of scientific management. (McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought). [The founding text on the topic.]

Taylor, Frederick. (1911). Principles of scientific management. (Internet History of Science Sourcebook, Fordham University). [The founding text on the topic.]

Tertullian (ca. 200). A treatise on the soul. (Christian Classics Ethereal Library, Wheaton College). [Earliest Christian document specifically on the nature of the soul.]

Turing, Alan M. (1950). Computing machinery and intelligence. Mind, 49, 433-460. (Abelard). [One of the founding documents of Artificial Intelligence, and the source of the famed "Turing Test."]

Turing, Alan M. (1950). Computing machinery and intelligence. Mind, 49, 433-460. (CogPrints). [One of the founding documents of Artificial Intelligence, and the source of the famed "Turing Test."]

Twain, Mark. (18??). What is man? (Wiretap Electronic Text Archive). [The humorist's reply to La Mettrie's L'homme Machine.]

Voltaire. (1764/1924). Soul. Entry in the Philosophical Dictionary. (Hanover College Department of History, IN). [From the best of the French philosophes.]

Vygotsky, Lev. (1927). The historical meaning of the crisis in psychology: A methodological investigation. (The Value of Knowledge). [From one of the most influential developmental psychologists of the 20th century.]

Vygotsky, Lev. (1934). Thought and language (Chapter 7: "Thought and Word"). (The Value of Knowledge). [The major work of one of the most influential developmental psychologists of the 20th century.]

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1855). On the law which has regulated the introduction of new species. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page). [From the co-discoverer of evolution by natural selection.]

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1858). On the tendency of varieties to depart indefinitely from the original type. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page). [From the co-discoverer of evolution by natural selection.]

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1864). The origin of human races and the antiquity of man deduced from the theory of "natural selection". (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1865). How to civilize savages. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page).

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1869). The origin of moral intuitions. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page).

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1870a). An answer to the arguments of Hume, Lecky, and others, against miracles. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page).

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1870b). On instinct in man and animals. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1873). Darwin's "The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals". (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1890). Human selection. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1903). Man's place in the universe. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Wallace, Alfred Russel. (1908). The present position of Darwinism. (Alfred Russel Wallace Page)

Weininger, Otto. (1903/1906). Sex and character. (Thinking Man's Minefield).

Wertheimer, Max. (1924). Gestalt theory. (The Gestalt Archive). [From the founder of Gestalt psychology.]

Wundt, Wilhelm. (1897). Outlines of psychology (Introduction). (The Value of Knowledge). [The major textbook on Wundt mature approach to psychology.]


An internet resource developed by
Christopher D. Green
York University, Toronto, Canada
ISSN 1492-3173


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